Holiday season news!

It’s been a while since I posted and now instead of using my words like a grownup I’ve decided to go all video on you like a millennial. But since WordPress won’t let me embed a YouTube link, you’ll have to click here or on the screen grab below to find out my latest news.

shorosh-launch-video-screen-grab

The video is only a minute long, so there’s no Christmas-ruining time investment!

(Hint: the video is about the first story in the Embodied prequel series…)

And on that mysterious note, season’s greetings to all of you. All the best for the holidays and 2017!

 

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The Embodied trilogy is complete!

If you’ve been waiting to find out what happens to Kari Marriner and the people she loves, wait no more! Diamond Splinters, book 3 of the Embodied trilogy, is out today. Available in paperback next month, you can buy the ebook right now for Kindle here, for Apple iOS devices here, for the Barnes & Noble Nook ereader here, and for Kobo here.

DIAMOND SPLINTERS Ebook cover lo-res

Please take a couple of minutes to leave a short review (I really want to hear readers’ thoughts!) on whichever site you purchased Diamond Splinters. Thanks!

An agent query letter that brought home the six-figure bacon!

Kristin Nelson at Nelson Literary Agency has kindly shared the query letter by author Scott Reintgen that convinced her to sign him. I’m guessing Scott was already pretty happy about that. But when Kristin brokered a mid-six-figure deal with Crown Books for Young Readers for Scott’s debut science fiction young adult trilogy, he must have been ecstatic.

Use the link above to read the full query letter that Scott sent Kristin and with one click on the Send button propelled his career into the stratosphere!

 

A great story is a great story…

Read about the amazing success story of Romanian author Eugen Chirovici (EO Chirovici) who published 10 novels in his native country with some success, then moved to Britain with his family three years ago and is now likely to earn seven figures from his first English-language novel.

The article I’ve linked to makes it sound like Chirovici’s success is out of the blue, but a little research shows this to be far from the truth. His non-fiction works have already been published in the US, he’s a member of the Romanian Academy of Sciences and holds three (!) honorary PhDs in Economics, Communication and History.

I’m a big fan of Vladimir Nabokov (be sure to read the Alfred Appel annotated version of Lolita first), and Chirovici is another Eastern European author who also goes to prove that English doesn’t even need to be your first language if you have imagination, storytelling ability and, oh yeah, maybe a touch of genius.

Dreadpunk. It’s scary stuff.

I’ve started a new writing project that will definitely be my next published work. And (wouldn’t you know) it isn’t either of the two novels I had begun planning and researching! Oh no, dear friends, this one is far more chilling and belongs in the genre of…

Dreadpunk logo

Dreadpunk is a term coined by horror maven Derek Tatum, who runs a blog of the same name. On it, he defines dreadpunk as:

“current popular culture that draws upon the imagery of pre-through early 20th century horror literature. As a term, dreadpunk is used as shorthand for contemporary Gothic horror works set in an often stylized past. It’s a tongue-in-cheek term derived from the penny dreadfuls…”

Dreadpunk was discussed at last month’s DragonCon. According to attendee reporter Aja Romano of website The Daily Dot:

“…the word implies a subversive take on fog-drenched Victoriana, tales of the supernatural mixed with late 19th-century aesthetics, and the recent wave of Gothic horror…”

Fantasy author Cherie Priest sees dreadpunk as a vehicle for social commentary:

“When you say something is punk, punk is shorthand for transgression,” Priest said to Daily Dot. The prefix describes “the form of transgression. You challenge the dominant paradigm of what frightens you, and you challenge the dominant paradigm of who has power.”

The Daily Dot even went so far as to define the 3 Laws of Dreadpunk, although Tatum himself clearly views the term as something less serious.

  1. Dreadpunk is based in horror or dark fantasy, with a particular emphasis the word “dread”: horror by implication or unseen.

  2. Dreadpunk is set within or informed by pre- or early-20th century horror—definitely no later than Lovecraft, with Victorian London serving as the default touchstone for the Dreadpunk aesthetic.

  3. Dreadpunk is self-aware and subversive, while still emphasizing classic horror traditions.

Here’s what I like about dreadpunk: the idea of using horror to undermine and subvert authority. Especially self-proclaimed authority, of which there was much in the Victorian British Empire. This could mean authority derived from social class, wealth, race, religion, “civilization”, “nobility”, or wielding a big stick. The true horrors of Victorian times were fuelled by new forms of authority, be they the cruel capitalism of the industrial revolution or violent colonial expansion. I see dreadpunk as a conduit through which the ravens can come home to roost.

I’ll reveal more about my dreadpunk work in another post very soon. In the meantime, start thinking about your deepest, darkest fear. Not now, but as you close your eyes for the last time… tonight.

Dreadpunk logo created by Aristotle C. Pramagioulis.